Saturday, July 30, 2011

Captain Japan : Old school Chopper




Captain Japan : Old school Chopper

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Mick Jagger on motorcycle, France 1971.




Mick Jagger on motorcycle, France 1971.

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Thursday, July 28, 2011

Mecatwin Triumph Racer

Mecatwin Triumph Racer

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Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Kuala Lumpur Harley Davidson in HD Art





Location : Harley Davidson Naza at Petaling Jaya

Photo by Edy Eskobar

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Ducati 750 s



It's combining of Classic motorcycles, custom motorcycles and cafe racers

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BSA Chopper

Old bike = Old School = Old School Chopper.....

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Long Old School Chopper

Long Old School Chopper

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Beer bike

Two barrel beer for Tyre..to those always need beer for a ride..this is your perfect bike with lot of beer..hehehe

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All About Motorcycles Helmet



Motorcycle helmets are very important in keeping people alive. In fact, there is nothing that will help you more in a crash situation than wearing one. A motorcycle helmet protects the head, and is also used as a face shield, for ear protection, and for intercom purposes.Modern helmets are made from plastics, and are often reinforced with Kevlar or a carbon fiber. For comfort and protection they generally have fabric and foam interiors. During a crash situation, a motorcycle helmet will break, which is what they are designed to do.

In essence, the helmet will absorb the energy and impact of the fall instead of the rider’s skull. As a result, they don’t offer much protection after their first impact. An impact may come from other reasons outside of a crash situation, ie. dropping the helmet from a high place, which may not cause any external damage. As a rule, helmets should be replaced after any type of major impact. But, it’s a good idea to replace it after three to four years, regardless of whet
her it has sustained impact or not; it’s a good safeguard.There are three types of motorcycle helmets; depending on how much protection you are looking for

:• Full-face helmet: covers the entire head, including the base of the skull. These helmets usually have a protective section that covers the chin as well. A plastic shield covers the eyes. The obvious benefit of a full-face helmet is its level of protection. The draw
backs are an increased level of heat and reduced level of hearing
.• 3/4 face helmet: covers the back of the skull, but doesn’t have chin protection. Some offer a visor, which blocks out bright sunlight or blinding headlights. A 3/4 face helmet provides similar rear protection as a full-face helmet, but not much protection f
or the face.• 1/2 helmet: provides the least amount of coverage generally allowed by law in the US.

All of these types of helmets are secured by a chin strap, which offers some level of protection by keeping the helmet on the head.More popular since mandat
ory helmet legislation was passed are "beanies", which are not certified and are used to by riders to make it appear that they are complying with the law. Such helmets are smaller and lighter than others and usually have a cool, sleek appearance. They are not good for crash protection because they lack the foam layer that protects the rider’s brain.A typical motorcycle helmet has two major protective mechanisms

:• An outer shell that is made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic, fiberglass or Kevlar. It is usually fairly thin. The purpose of this hard outer shell is to prevent penetration of the helmet by a pointed object that could puncture the skull. It also provides structure to the inner liner so it does not disintegrate when it hits concrete, pavement or any other hard surface. The foams used on motorcycle helmets usually have very little resistance to penetration and abrasion

.• A thick, soft inner liner made of expanded polystyrene foam or expanded polypropylene foam.

The purpose of the foam liner is to crush during impact, which increases the distance and time over which the helmet stops, reducing its acceleration.HJC motorcycle helmets are one of the best brands of helmets in the industry.

They offer a complete product line for every type of budget. Their helmets are categorized by feature level, starting with the CS Series on the low end, to the HJC Series in the middle price point, and the AC Series in the high end.Up North Sports is an established power sports accessory business located in the small town of Bemidji, Minnesota, 100 miles south of the Canadian border. They specialize in motorcycle helmets such as bell motorcycle helmets and, which have numerous available features and are available in youth sizes too.

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Drinking and Riding


While statistics often don't tell the whole story, when used properly, statistics can give a very clear explanation of events.

Here's a scary statistic for you. More than 47% of motorcycle fatalities involve a rider under the influence of alcohol. In this day and age, it's hard to believe anyone could be stupid enough to get on a motorcycle after drinking a few beers, but the reality is, it happens everyday. While its bad enough to get behind the wheel of a car under the influence, getting on a motorcycle under the influence is sheer stupidity. Let's face it, riding a motorcycle involves a great deal more coordination and skill than driving a car. On a bike you have to balance, steer, counter steer, clutch, shift and use 2 separate brakes. The first thing alcohol does to you is affect your motor skills, in other words, your coordination. That's why field sobriety tests examine and test your ability to do two or more things at once.

I've heard people say many times, "I just had a couple of beers, I'm fine." The fact is, depending on your weight and how much food you have in your system, even 1 beer can have an effect on you. Alcohol is a sneaky drug. You may feel fine, be able to walk straight and not slur your words, yet, if you had to make a quick evasive maneuver on your bike such as a simple brake then swerve, you'd be in trouble with a capital T.

Remember, alcohol affects your ability to do more than one thing at a time and even a simple brake and swerve requires you to perform several tasks. First, you'll have to decide which to do first, brake or swerve. Once that decision is made you'll have to push on one of the bars to make the bike swerve. Will you remember which one you'll have to push on in a panic situation with a couple of beers in your system? Then, you may have to brake and even one beer can slow your reflexes. Now with your reflexes slowed, will you be able to brake in time? Will you remember to put more force on your front brake than the rear? Will you be able to keep that rear brake from locking? Most riders have a problem with the rear brake dead sober. Oh, and don't forget, you have to pull in the clutch and down shift as well during the brake and swerve.

The fact is, in an emergency brake and swerve maneuver, the average rider will be lucky not to crash. The even slightly impaired rider, the one who "just had a couple of beers" has NO chance. Think about it. Is it worth taking that chance?

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Co-Rider’s Handbook

So you’re the co-rider this trip. What could you do to make the ride more pleasurable for both you and the rider?

The Look

No, The Look is not a style of clothing. It’s even easier (and cheaper) than that. The Look is looking at the right place as the bike makes a turn. Why not take advantage of the same technique a trained rider uses to keep oriented in a turn? The place to look is over the rider’s shoulder in the direction of the turn. As you look over the rider’s right shoulder in a right turn, look all the way through the turn and keep your eyes level with the horizon. This means tilting your head away from the direction of the turn. If you’re turning right, lean your body right but keep your head vertical. Using The Look keeps you leaning with the rider and keeps you oriented properly so you can enjoy the turns even more.

A Sense of Direction

Wouldn’t you like your rider to pay more attention to the road and less to the map? If you think it’s hard to read a map while driving, it’s even harder to read a map while riding a motorcycle. The rider is usually glad to have someone else navigate. As a co-rider you can concentrate on the navigation, allowing the rider to concentrate on riding.

Preparation

A very short checklist can make any ride a lot more pleasant. Do you have rain gear, sunscreen, a map and sunglasses? These items are often not in plain sight but will be sorely missed if they are needed and not there. Of course, there is much more that can be put on your checklist for the trip. You do have a checklist, don’t you?

Not all preparation can be done just before the trip. Was the trip planned so the rider had a chance to get adequate sleep before starting? Working all day and riding all night is probably not the best plan for rider or co-rider.

Results

Investing a little time on preparation beforehand and a little effort on The Look and navigation during the ride can make it more pleasant for both the rider and the co-rider.

by Robert Vaughan

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

KR 750z Rat Bike Bobber chopper


KR 750z Rat Bike Bobber chopper
credit to : http://www.bikermetric.com

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The Ferrari Choppers










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